Rare Books London - London's festival of old and rare books – June 2019

June 2019

Book Fairs

Book Fairs
Sunday 20th May 10am-3.30pm

Bloomsbury Summer Book Fair

Etc Fairs’ Summer Bonanza Book Fair.  Showcasing a range of antiquarian books, second hand books, out of print books, maps, prints, postcards,  manuscripts and ephemera on sale, the Bloomsbury Book Fair also has auctioneers and bookbinders regularly exhibiting.

The Bloomsbury Book Fair is the largest monthly book fair in the UK and attracts some of the UK’s finest specialist dealers.

Admission Fee:£2 until 12.30pm, free thereafter

 

 

Galleon Suite, Royal National Hotel, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0DG
Book Fairs
Thursday 24th May 12-8pm, Friday 25th May 10am-7pm; Saturday 26th May 10am-5pm

ABA Rare Book Fair London

Now celebrating its 61st year, and coming to Battersea Park for the first time in 2018, this major three-day event organised by the Antiquarian Booksellers’ Association is one of the largest and most prestigious antiquarian book fairs in the world, showcasing rare, unique and unusual items from 170 plus leading UK and international dealers.

The fair will be opened by Sir David Attenborough at noon on Thursday.

In addition to the regular exhibitors, we have a carefully selected series of exhibitions and live events run by specialist organisations and craftspeople. Fascinating hands-on workshops (including family-friendly activities) give patrons a chance to dive straight into the world of fine printing, bookbinding, and calligraphy.

 

Complimentary tickets available at www.rarebookfairlondon.com

Battersea Evolution, Queenstown Road, London SW8 4NW
Book Fairs
Friday 25th May 1-7pm; Saturday 26th May 10am-4pm

PBFA London Antiquarian Book Fair

Book dealers from the UK, Europe and US will be offering books, maps, prints, photographs, manuscripts and printed ephemera with prices to suit book hunter, large and small.

The PBFA’s leading London fair.

Complimentary tickets at www.pbfalondonbookfair.org

 

ILEC Conference Centre, Ibis Hotel, 47 Lillie Road, London SW6 1UD
Book Fairs
Sunday 27th May 9.30am-3pm

Bloomsbury Summer Ephemera, Book & Postcard Fair

Ephemera, Books, Postcards, Prints, Maps and Photographs…

…all under one roof! The monthly Bloomsbury Ephemera Fairs are a genuinely great opportunity to browse some of the most varied and intriguing examples of ephemera, alongside a wide variety of manuscripts, printed books and other printed material, plus maps, prints, photographs and more. If you are a collector of any of these, or generally any works on paper, then the Etc Fairs Bloomsbury Ephemera Fairs will definitely have something for you. Regularly featuring many of the leading dealers in these sectors, our London fairs cater for all tastes and budgets.

Entry £1.50

Galleon Suite, Royal National Hotel, Bloomsbury, London WC1H 0DG

Talks

Talks, Tours
Saturday 12th May, 11am-c. 4pm

A Day at the Type Archive

Before the invention of letterpress printing by the German Johannes Gutenberg, early in the fifteenth century, written words were painstakingly committed to page with pens by scribes; a process so slow that, inevitably, books, and consequently literacy, were the privilege of the few. Letterpress, whilst still time-consuming by modern standards, was a comparatively quick process, and once the type was set and the press ready to roll, multiple near-identical copies of the same page could be made almost ad infinitum. Letterpress was perhaps the first industrial process, and its invention paved the way for an explosion in the distribution of the written word, and undoubtedly hastened the world that we live in today. Letterpress is no longer big business, but its allure still remains. A new generation of designers and readers, brought up on computers, have become fascinated by the humanity of the process and the warmth of its results.

Founded over twenty years ago in the heart of South London, the Type Archive brings together the collected artefacts of the three major players in British type manufacturing history: the Stephenson and Blake foundry, latterly of Sheffield, although originally existing as the William Caslon foundry in the City of London; the Monotype Corporation, in London and Salfords, Surrey; and the De Little wood type manufacturer, in York. The importance of this holy trinity of companies cannot be overestimated: not only are they of national interest, they also had international influence well beyond the borders of the former British Empire. The collections serve as an inspiration and as a resource, not only to designers and academics alike, but also to those interested in the history and complexities of written language.

On Saturday the twelfth of May, 2018, the archive will open its doors to a limited number of Rare Books London visitors. On this day the archive’s staff will guide visitors through the collections and will demonstrate a range of  processes, from casting type through to letterpress printing. Visitors will also have the chance to do some printing themselves. Refreshment will be provided.

 

The cost of the day is set at £25

 

 

Image provided by Jamie Pearson.

Type Archive, 100 Hackford Rd, London SW9 0QU
Talks
Sunday 13th May, 2.30pm

Cartographical Highlights from Sotheby’s: 15th May Travel sale

Sotheby’s Book Specialist Cecilie Gasseholm will talk about some of the Map highlights from this upcoming sale, which includes the library of Colin and Joan Deacon (books on voyages and travel). The sale features beautiful works of natural history, world maps and atlases, colour-plate books, accounts of exploration, and topographical photographs.
Tickets are free.
Sotheby's, The Book Room, 34 – 35 New Bond Street, London, W1A 2AA
Talks
Monday 14th May 3.30-5pm

Behind the concrete façade: background and highlights of Senate House Library, University of London

Have you seen Shakespeare’s First Folio at close quarters? Or the first edition of Darwin’s Origin of the Species, or coloured sixteenth-century maps? In this hour Rare Books Librarian Dr Karen Attar delivers an insight into the manuscripts and early printed books at the University of London’s Senate House Library, talking about the characters who collected them and how they came here. A small selection of early treasures will be highlighted and displayed.

 

A limited number of free tickets are available

Senate House Library, Senate House, University of London, Malet St, Bloomsbury, London WC1E 7HU
Talks
Tuesday 15th May 5.30-7.30pm

The Book Collector Presents: Modern First Editions

The Book Collector will be hosting a podium discussion about Modern First Editions at Senate House on Tuesday, 15th May 2018 from 5.30 pm to 7.30 pm. A panel of experts representing auction houses, antiquarian book dealers and collectors will be discussing how the value of Modern Firsts has evolved over the last 66 years. How fashion has changed and what the current trends are. A chance to ask about dos and don’ts and how best to build your own collection. A discussion that will be informative for new collectors as well as already established ones.

The panel will be chaired by:

Lucy Scholes is a freelance critic and essayist who writes about books, film and art. She is a contributing editor at the online literary magazine Bookanista, and writes for the Financial Times, BBC Culture, the New York Times Book Review, Literary Hub, NYR Daily and Granta, amongst others. She has a PhD in English literature and psychoanalytic theory from Birkbeck, University of London, and used to teach English and History at Goldsmiths. She is a fledgling collector!

The panel consists of:

A. N. Devers is a writer, arts journalist and critic, and rare book dealer based in London. She is the owner of The Second Shelf, a new online and pop-up bookshop of rare books, modern first editions, and rediscovered works by women. The International Contributing Editor of A Public Space, she has written for The New Yorker, New Republic, Lapham’s Quarterly, Lenny, Los Angeles Times, Longreads, The Paris Review, Prospect, Salon, Slate, Fine Books, and The Washington Post, among other publications.She is obsessed with dead authors’ houses and used to run a popular website devoted to them. She lives in London for the moment.

Matthew Haley is head of books and manuscripts at Bonhams auctioneers, and an expert on the BBC’s Antiques Roadshow. An undergraduate interest in Virginia Woolf led to curiosity about the Hogarth Press, antiquarian booksellers’ catalogues, and forays into the world of collecting first editions. Starting out as a librarian, Matthew quickly switched to the rare book trade in 2004, and has been working for Bonhams ever since, in London,

New York and Los Angeles.

Neil Pearson has collected rare books for thirty years: his specialism is nineteenth and twentieth century first edition literature, with a particular interest in the expatriate literary movement of Paris between the wars. He is the author of Obelisk (Liverpool University Press, 2007), a history of the notorious Paris imprint which in the 1930s published the early work of, among others, Henry Miller, Lawrence Durrell and Anaïs Nin. In 2011 he researched, compiled and wrote They Were What They Were: A Catalogue of Early Gay Fiction, 1862 -1960. After collecting books for so many years, he’s delighted finally to be selling some.

This will be a discussion followed by drinks and although entry is free, prebooking is essential.

Discussion followed by drinks.

Entry is free, but must be prebooked.

 

Image kindly provided by Bonhams

 

Senate House, University of London, Malet St, Bloomsbury, London WC1E 7HU

Tours

Talks, Tours
Saturday 12th May, 11am-c. 4pm

A Day at the Type Archive

Before the invention of letterpress printing by the German Johannes Gutenberg, early in the fifteenth century, written words were painstakingly committed to page with pens by scribes; a process so slow that, inevitably, books, and consequently literacy, were the privilege of the few. Letterpress, whilst still time-consuming by modern standards, was a comparatively quick process, and once the type was set and the press ready to roll, multiple near-identical copies of the same page could be made almost ad infinitum. Letterpress was perhaps the first industrial process, and its invention paved the way for an explosion in the distribution of the written word, and undoubtedly hastened the world that we live in today. Letterpress is no longer big business, but its allure still remains. A new generation of designers and readers, brought up on computers, have become fascinated by the humanity of the process and the warmth of its results.

Founded over twenty years ago in the heart of South London, the Type Archive brings together the collected artefacts of the three major players in British type manufacturing history: the Stephenson and Blake foundry, latterly of Sheffield, although originally existing as the William Caslon foundry in the City of London; the Monotype Corporation, in London and Salfords, Surrey; and the De Little wood type manufacturer, in York. The importance of this holy trinity of companies cannot be overestimated: not only are they of national interest, they also had international influence well beyond the borders of the former British Empire. The collections serve as an inspiration and as a resource, not only to designers and academics alike, but also to those interested in the history and complexities of written language.

On Saturday the twelfth of May, 2018, the archive will open its doors to a limited number of Rare Books London visitors. On this day the archive’s staff will guide visitors through the collections and will demonstrate a range of  processes, from casting type through to letterpress printing. Visitors will also have the chance to do some printing themselves. Refreshment will be provided.

 

The cost of the day is set at £25

 

 

Image provided by Jamie Pearson.

Type Archive, 100 Hackford Rd, London SW9 0QU
Tours
Monday 14th May 6-7.30pm

Three Centuries of English Freemasonry: A Gallery Tour with Books

An exclusive Librarian led tour of the Three Centuries Gallery of the Library and Museum of Freemasonry, exploring how the history of English freemasonry can be told using books, manuscripts and ephemera.

Highlights include: Anderson’s Constitutions of 1723, the Grand Lodge of England’s first rule book, with its remarkable frontispiece; ritual books with locked secrets; beautiful masonic bindings; letters from 18th Century African-Americans; minute books kept by prisoners of war and anti-masonic literature from 17th century broadsheets to 1930s fascist propaganda.

Free but ticketed, pre-booking essential.

 

The Library and Museum of Freemasonry, Freemasons’ Hall, Great Queen Street, London, WC2B 5AZ
Tours
Friday 18th May 2-3pm

Treasures of the Fellows’ Library of Dulwich College

Fellows’ Librarian Robert Weaver leads a tour of Dulwich’s book and manuscript treasures built up over four hundred years within the Fellows’ Library, including unique items from the world’s finest collection of Jacobean Theatre History.

Tickets are free, but must be prebooked.
Dulwich College, London SE21 7LD
Tours
Saturday 19th May 11.30am, 3pm

China and Siam Through the Lens of John Thomson: Gallery Tour

A free gallery tour of an exhibition at the Brunei Gallery|SOAS on China and Siam through the lens of John Thomson 

This is the first London exhibition of Scottish photographer John Thomson’s (1837-1921) work which encompasses his ten years in Asia.  The exhibition will run from 13 April to 23 June and includes images from newly discovered glass negatives held at the Wellcome Library, London.  Exhibition co-curator Betty Yao MBE will introduce Thomson’s life and work and follow his footsteps in Asia.  She will highlight the people and places he photographed and divulge the story, the twists and turns behind the survival of this valuable collection through 150 years.

For more information on the exhibition go to www.johnthomsonexhibition.org. Related public lectures and a study day will be listed.

Tickets are free, but must be prebooked

The 3pm tour is now full. Spaces still available for 11.30am.

 

Image courtesy of The Wellcome Collection.

Brunei Gallery SOAS, University of London Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square,  London WC1H 0XG

Auctions

Auctions
Viewing 10-14th May, Auction 15th May

Travel, Atlases, Maps and Natural History: including the Library of Colin and Joan Deacon

In this sale on the 15 May we are delighted to offer the library of Colin and Joan Deacon, which comprises a wonderful collection of sea voyages, exploration and British naval history. The sale also features beautiful works of natural history, world maps and atlases, colour-plate books, accounts of exploration, and topographical photographs.

 Viewing:
10-14th May
Auction 15th May:
Session 1: 10.00am
Session 2: 2.30pm
Sotheby's, 34 – 35 New Bond Street, London, W1A 2AA
Auctions
Viewing 16-21st May, Sale 22nd May

Fine Autograph Music and Musical Manuscripts

The two music sales on 22 May are “Fine autograph music: the Property of Helmut Nanz and family”, which includes important manuscripts by Beethoven, Mozart, Liszt, Wagner  and Stravinsky.  The 2nd sale contains music by Gershwin, Brahms, Mahler, Richard Strauss and early music, including an unrecorded C16 lute manuscript.

 

Viewing: 16-21 May 2018

Auction: 22 May 2018

 

 

Sotheby's, 34 – 35 New Bond Street, London, W1A 2AA
Auctions
Viewing from Saturday 19th to Thursday 24th May

Audubon’s Birds of America and other auction highlights

The Duke of Portland copy of Audubon’s Birds of America is the finest copy in private hands of the most beautiful ornithological book ever published. In advance of its auction in New York on 14 June, it will be on view at Christie’s London alongside other highlights of Christie’s summer book auctions.

Viewing times
Saturday 19th May 12–5pm
Sunday 20th May 12–5pm
Monday 21th May 9.30am – 4.30pm
Tuesday 22th May 9.30am – 8pm
Wednesday 23th May 9.30am – 4.30pm
Thursday 24th May 9.30am – 4.30pm

Contact
Thomas Venning
tvenning@christies.com
020 7389 2255

Christie's King Street, 8 King St, St. James's, London SW1Y 6QT
Auctions
Viewing from 23-29th May, Sale on 30th

Wassenaar Zoo: A Dutch Private Library

Viewing:
Wednesday 23 May 9am – 4.30pm
Thursday 24 May 9am – 4.30pm
Friday 25 May 9am – 4.30pm
Saturday 26 May – 11am to 3pm
Sunday 27 May – 11am to 3pm
Monday 28 May – Bank Holiday, closed
Tuesday 29 May 9am – 4.30pm

Sale:
Wednesday 30 May 2018

Bonhams, 101 New Bond St, Mayfair, London W1S 1SR

Walks

Walks
Sunday 20th May 1.30pm

Bloomsbury’s lost libraries: a walk through some forgotten book collections

Twenty-first century London contains some of the finest book collections in the world, but what about the libraries that haven’t survived? If you know where to look, London’s streets and alleyways are crammed with the ghosts of libraries past.

This walk will carry you back through Bloomsbury’s history, to long-forgotten libraries, readers, librarians and collectors. Alice Ford-Smith (Bernard Quaritch Ltd) will reveal some of the links between London’s past and present book collections- and the tales of enterprise, transformation, obsession and destruction that are often behind them

The walk will start at the cloister entrance of Senate House, and finish at the Royal National Hotel.

Tickets are free, but must be prebooked.

 

Sponsored by CILIP Library and Information History Group.

Senate House, University of London, Malet St, Bloomsbury, London WC1E 7HU
Walks
Sunday May 27th 10.30am

Love in Marylebone

Come and walk the elegant streets of Marylebone for a tour of houses associated with literary love affairs (and a few others) ranging from the romantic to the sordidly scandalous.  The novelist with two mistresses in adjacent streets, the scandal of the Profumo affair, an American poet’s marriage to a notorious ballet dancer and the playwright who fought a duel to protect his beloved – just a few of the stories we hear.  And also the tale of an adventurous dog.

Led by Anthony Davis of Booksteps.

This walk begins near Oxford Street and finishes near Baker Street station.  Exact details will be circulated to ticket holders.

Tickets are free, but prebooking is essential.

 

 

Oxford Street
Walks
Saturday 2nd June 10.30am

From the Devil’s Acre to St Peter’s Gates

This is a literary walking tour around an area of dramatic contrasts.  See two of London’s most beautiful early 18th-century squares and the site of one of London’s worst slums, memorably described by Charles Dickens; see through the windows (literally) of JS Mill and TE Lawrence, pass where John Milton lived, look Queen Anne in the eye and hear about the effects of social housing and Nazi bombs.

Led by Anthony Davis of Booksteps.

This walk begins at St James’s Park station and ends at Westminster. Punctuality is essential, the tour won’t wait!

Tickets are free, but prebooking is essential.

St James's Park Station, Petty France, London SW1H 0BD
Walks
Sunday 10th June 11am

Bloomsbury’s lost libraries: a walk through some forgotten book collections

Twenty-first century London contains some of the finest book collections in the world, but what about the libraries that haven’t survived? If you know where to look, London’s streets and alleyways are crammed with the ghosts of libraries past.

This walk will carry you back through Bloomsbury’s history, to long-forgotten libraries, readers, librarians and collectors. Alice Ford-Smith (Bernard Quaritch Ltd) will reveal some of the links between London’s past and present book collections- and the tales of enterprise, transformation, obsession and destruction that are often behind them

The walk will start at the cloister entrance of Senate House, and finish at the Royal National Hotel.

Tickets are free, but must be prebooked.

 

Sponsored by CILIP Library and Information History Group.

Senate House, University of London, Malet St, Bloomsbury, London WC1E 7HU